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Which Blood Pressure Monitor for a Low Vision Person?

by Barbara 20. June 2008 09:23

Question about the product: Lumiscope 1100 Manual Inflate Blood Pressure Monitor.

Q: "I am thinking about buying this unit for my mother who has low vision. So the display area has to be large. Can you tell me how large the numbers are on the display? Also the pumping bulb has to be easy to pump. Our doctor says the manual ones are most accurate."-LAURA

Answer: The Lumiscope 1100 is a manual inflate blood pressure monitor with a digital read-out. This is called a semi-automatic blood pressure monitor because it requires inflation using a pump up bulb. Some people like being in control of the inflation level. The bulbs don't require a lot of force to inflate but have to be squeezed quickly many times to inflate above the person's anticipated blood pressure level. The bulbs last several years or more and then can be replaced for under $15 plus shipping.

The newer blood pressure monitors made in the past 4 or 5 years all have features that limit the amount of inflation and/or learn how much inflation is needed based upon the last user's level.

We do sell manual blood pressure monitors with or without attached stethoscopes. The manual blood pressure monitors used in physician's offices are professional models and are used by trained medical professionals. Taking your own blood pressure using a stethoscope and a manual blood pressure monitor takes practice and training. If you mom is well coordinated and has a teacher, she can learn to take blood pressure using a manual unit.

Most manual units do not have large numbers on the display. If your mom has low vision, I suggest that you either choose a unit with a large display or choose one of the talking blood pressure monitors. The automatic units are quite accurate these days. If you use the monitor properly, which means the proper sized arm or wrist cuff and sitting in the proper position, the readings will be quite accurate.

The Lumiscope 1145 automatic wrist blood pressure monitor and the Oregon Scientific BPW810 automatic wrist blood pressure monitor both feature multiple memories (60 per user or 120 total) and large numeric displays. If your physician wants a log of readings, your mom can display the readings along with the date and time when they were taken. Wrist units fit almost everyone unless they have a wrestler's size wrist or are extremely petite.

The arm units all require that the arm be measured so that the proper arm cuff is ordered or that the person purchase a unit that either comes with several arm cuffs or has an arm cuff that fits small to large arms.

So, please make sure you measure your mom's arm with a cloth or plastic tape measure before you purchase any arm blood pressure monitor. And do the same if her wrist is tiny or very large and you plan to buy a wrist cuff model.

Hope this helps with your decision.

Sincerely,
Barbara